20 February 2009

China Invests in Production and Commodities While the US Feeds the Sharks

China is securing long term supplies of oil, aluminum, iron and other hard commodities at 'favorable prices for years to come.'

The United States is investing in increasingly worthless paper, insolvent banks, crony capitalist ponzi schemes, non-productive consumption, and enormous bonuses for Wall Street financiers.

After a visit to China a few years ago, touring their factories with workers quietly hunched over their worktables in fear, working whatever hours were offered in difficult conditions, Bill Gates observed that this was 'his kind of capitalism.'

The choices you make, what you choose to do or not to do, will pay significant returns, either good or ill, for your children and your children's children.

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

NY Times
With Cash to Spend, China Starts Investing Globally

By David Barboza
February 21, 2009

SHANGHAI — With the world suffering through a tight credit market, China has suddenly gone shopping.

Beijing said on Friday that one of its big state-owned banks, the China Development Bank, agreed to lend the Brazilian oil giant Petrobras $10 billion in exchange for sending China a long-term supply of oil.

That investment came after similar deals were signed this week with Russia and Venezuela, bringing China’s total oil investments this month to $41 billion

China’s biggest aluminum producer also agreed earlier this month to invest $19.5 billion in Australia’s Rio Tinto, one of the world’s biggest mining companies. And last Monday, the China Minmetals Corporation bid $1.7 billion to acquire Australia’s OZ Minerals, a huge zinc mining company...

China wants reliable supplies of crude oil, to fuel its growing transport sector; it needs iron ore for steel production, and copper and aluminum to build homes and consumer goods...

Analysts say China could continue to make deals for a variety of small oil and gas companies, mineral producers and mining firms.

This week, for instance, shares of the Australian miner Fortescue Metals Group rose after reports the company was in talks with China over a big investment to help the company expand.

In many cases, China has struck deals in countries that have access to large supplies of oil and minerals but where American and European countries are not well-positioned, like parts of Africa and the Middle East.

In one deal this week, China made an alliance with the government of Hugo Chávez, the president of Venezuela, who has denounced American leadership.

While the oil deals announced vary in terms, analysts say they ensure China a steady supply of oil for decades to come, sometimes at favorable prices....